Get ready France, Germany and four other territories. Netflix is dusting off its passport and getting ready to contend with Amazon on the continent. Looking to keep its revenue growth going, Netflix is going branching out from the UK and Scandinavia and going after core EU countries.

One area that Netflix will not have to worry about is net neutrality. EU lawmakers are already way ahead of the curve, voting to ensure net neutrality. Here in the states, we are still arguing over which corporate overlords we will have running the country.

Just a note on Netflix expansion, you don’t have the right to forget you watched the same movie 80 times. That’s on you, so own it.

The streaming service will be going up against entrenched rivals, such as Canal Plus in France. Also, providers in EU countries have stricter deals, which could make Netflix less appealing as it fights to secure programming. What the company does have is buzzworthy original content.

With shows like House of Cards and Orange is the New Black, Netflix was able to outpace rival, Amazon, in subscription adds in the UK. Now, the company hopes to pull off the same feat in Germany and France. The two countries do have significant broadband infrastructure, making the new targets appealing for Netflix.

Netflix’s expansion plans come as it fights on two fronts in the U.S. On one hand, CEO Reed Hastings, is fighting against the proposed net neutrality rules in the United States. This would formalize a fast lane for content providers that are looking for speed. On the other front, the company has already signed deals with cable companies such as Comcast for guaranteed access.

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So, while Netflix fights for net neutrality, it is working to weaken it by signing deals for the very fast lane they are opposed to. Once the genie is out of the bottle, it become nearly impossible to put back in.

Broadband ISPs used Title II regulations to build their network on the cheap, but are now welcoming deals to increase profitability on the backs of consumers. Say what you will about EU legislators, at least they have their heads screwed on when it comes to protecting an open Internet.

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