We are about ten days away from the official release of Microsoft’s newest OS – Windows 10. Here are four things you need to know leading up to its release.

1) Staggered rollout

You might not get Windows 10 on July 29. Microsoft is instead opting to release the update in waves. Starting July 29, Microsoft will officially release Windows 10 to Windows Insiders (beta testers). They will then release in waves after July 29th.

Already reserved your copy via computer? You will get a notification once your PC is ready for the upgrade.

windows 10 update notification

2) 10 Years of Automatic Updates for Windows 10

Microsoft recently updated its Window’s Lifestyle Fact Sheet. In it, Microsoft says they will offer support for Windows 10 for ten years.

Windows 10 ten years updates

What’s the difference between mainstream and extended support? The main difference is that mainstream support offers users the ability to “request to change product design and features.” Extended support doesn’t offer this option, but you will continue to receive security updates.

3) Automatic Updates

Windows 10 automatic updates will be mandatory for home users. If you install Windows 10 you have to agree to receive Microsoft updates automatically. In a statement, Microsoft told Re/code, “The license terms for Windows 10 require Automatic Updates be enabled as part of keeping our customers secure and delivering Windows as a service.”

The upside to this will be less vulnerable PCs. There’s also an obvious downside. What if Microsoft releases a buggy update? Every Windows 10 home user was already forced to download it. It’s the biggest downside and the one feature Microsoft is seeing pushback on.

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We’ll see how it goes. It’s on Microsoft to show us they won’t screw this up.

Business users can turn automatic updates off and wait for their IT departments to test them first.

4) Stream Games from Xbox One to Windows 10

Windows 10 isn’t even out yet, but Microsoft went ahead and enabled the feature. You can remote play Xbox One games on a PC, laptop or tablet running Windows 10. All you need is a device running Windows 10 and a decent network connection.

Xbox’s Major Nelson has the details on how to get the feature up and running.

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