Well this throws Jurassic Park out the window. They had a T-Rex? Yeah, well they didn’t have her rocking feathers. A new study is out suggesting that all dinosaurs had feathers, or at least they had the ability to grow them. Sorry, a Raptor with peacock feathers just doesn’t have the same feel when watching Jurassic Park.

The study, published in the journal Science, looks at fossils recovered in Siberia. A sauropod was discovered to have its head feather covered. This throws out that theory that only flesh-eating theropods rocked the feather look. The new dinosaur is called Kulindradromeus zabaikalicus – they could stand to shorten that. The exhibit has the dinosaur with reptile like scales on its tail and shins, bristles on its back and head, and feathers covering its arms and legs.

“I was really amazed when I saw this,” said lead author Dr. Pascal Godefroit from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS) in Brussels. “We knew that some of the plant-eating ornithischian dinosaurs had simple bristles, and we couldn’t be sure whether these were the same kinds of structures as bird and theropod feathers. Our new find clinches it: all dinosaurs had feathers, or at least the potential to sprout feathers.”

A new theory is that smaller dinosaurs may have been covered with colorful feathers. It is possible that the feathers were lost as the dinosaurs matured. This new discovery suggests that even the earliest dinosaurs may have had feathers, or at least the ability to sprout them.

If a movie studio actually needed a reason to remake a film, Jurassic Park is up. They can claim science as the reason for the money grab. There will be running, screaming and feather collecting?

All jokes aside at Jurassic Park, the find is incredible and should work to renew interest in dinosaurs for kids and adults alike. It is an exciting discovery for the field.

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